Augmentative Communication Resources

Bibliography and Resources

  1. Ball, L.J., Bilyeu, D.V., Prentice, C., & Beukelman, D.R. (2005).Augmentative and alternative communication: Infusing communication in an academic setting. In D. Edyburn, K. Higgins, & R. Boone (Eds.), Handbook of special education technology research and practice (pp. 423-451). Whitefish Bay, WI: Knowledge by Design.
  2. Baumgart, Diane, Johnson, J. & Helmstetter, (1990) Augmentative and Alternative Communication Systems for Persons with Moderate and Severe Disabilities, Paul H. Brooks, Baltimore.
  3. Beeler, T. (1993). I Can Read! I Can Write!. Creative Teaching Press, Inc., Cypress, CA.
  4. Beukelman, D. & Mirenda, P. (2005). Augmentative and alternative communication for children and adults (Third Edition). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  5. Beukelman, D. (2005). “Augmentative and Alternative Communication Processes.” In D. Beukelman & Pat Mirenda (Eds.) Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Children and Adults with Complex Communication Needs, (pp. 3-14). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  6. Beukelman, D. (2005). “Message Management: Alternative Access.” In D. Beukelman & Pat Mirenda (Eds.) Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Children and Adults with Complex Communication Needs, Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  7. Beukelman, D. (2005). “Message Management: Vocabulary, Small Talk, and Storytelling.” In D. Beukelman & Pat Mirenda (Eds.) Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Children and Adults with Complex Communication Needs, (pp. 15-35). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  8. Bruno, J. (1991). Book Cooks: Literature-Based Classroom Cooking: 35 Recipes for Favorite Books. Cypress, CA. Creative Teaching Press, Inc.
  9. Carson-Dellosa, (1994). Making Books: A Collection for All Seasons. Greensboro, NC: Carson-Dellosa Publishing Co., Inc.
    Clark, Jacquie. (1997). News 4 You. Solana Beach, CA: Mayer-Johnson Co.
  10. Clay, Marie, M. (2000) Concepts About Print: What Have Children Learned About the Way We
  11. Cook, Albert & Susan Hussey, (1995) Assistive Technologies: Principles and Practice, Mosby-Year Book, Inc., St. Louis,.
    Cunnigham, P. & Allington, R (1999) Classrooms That Work: They Can All Read and Write. New York. Longman, An imprint of Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.
  12. Cunnigham, P., Hall, D. and Sigmon, C. (1999) The Teacher’s Guide to the Four Blocks. Greensboro, NC Carson-Dellosa Publishing Co., Inc.
  13. Cunningham, P. & Allington, R.(1999) Classrooms That Work: They Can All Read and Write. New York. Longman, An imprint of Addison Wesley Longman, Inc.
  14. Cunningham, P., Hall, D. and Sigmon, C. (1999) The Teacher’s Guide to the Four Blocks. Greensboro, NC. Carson-Dellosa Publishing Co., Inc.
  15. Elder, Pamela & Goosens, Carol (1994) Engineering Training Environments for Interactive Augmentative Communication: Strategies for Adolescents and Adults who are Moderately/Severely Developmentally Delayed, Southeast Augmentative Communication Conference Publications Clinician Series, Birmingham, AL.
  16. Elder, Pamela & Goossens’, Carol, (1994) Engineering Training Environments for Interactive Augmentative Communication: Strategies for Adolescents and Adults who are Moderately/Severely Developmentally Delayed, Southeast Augmentative Communication Conference Publications Clinician Series, Birmingham, AL.
  17. Fairfax, Barbars & Garcia, Adela, (1992) Read! Write! Publish! Making Books in the Classroom, Creative Teaching Press, Inc., Cypress, CA.
  18. Feldman, Jean. (2000) The Book Shoppe. Minneapolis, MN. Ablenet.
  19. Fountas, Irene C, & Pinnell, Gay S. (1999) Matching Books to Readers: Using Leveled Books in Buided Reading, K-3, Portsmouth, NH , Heinemann
  20. Galvin, Jan, & Marcia J. Scherer, (1996) Evaluating, Selecting and Using Appropriate Assistive Technology, Aspen Publishers, Gaithersburg, MD.
  21. Glennen, Sharon & Church, G.(1992)The Handbook of Assistive Technology, Singular Publishing Group, Inc., San Diego
  22. Glennen, Sharon & Decoste, Denise C., (1997) Handbook of Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Singular Publishing Group, Inc., San Diego.
  23. Glennen, Sharon, & Decoste, Denise C., (1997) Handbook of Augmentative and Alternative Communication, San Diego, Singular Publishing Group, Inc..
  24. Goldstein, Howard, Kaczmarek, Louise, A. & English, Kristina M. (2002) Promoting Social Communication: Children with Developmental Disabilities from Birth to Adolescence. Baltimore, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., Inc.
  25. Goosens, Carol, Crain, Sharon & Elder, Pamela (1994) (Revised). Engineering The Preschool Environment for Interactive Symbolic Communication, Southeast Augmentative Communication Conference Publications Clinician Series, Birmingham, AL.
  26. Goossens’, Carol, Crain, Sharon & Elder, Pamela (1994) (Revised). Engineering The Preschool Environment for Interactive Symbolic Communication, Southeast Augmentative Communication Conference Publications Clinician Series, Birmingham, AL.
  27. Hodgdon, L. (1996) Visual Strategies For Improving Communication. Troy, MI: QuirkRoberts Publishing.
  28. Hodgdon, L. (1999) Solving Behavior Problems in Autism: ImprovingCommunication with Visual Strategies. Troy, MI: QuirkRoberts Publishing.
  29. Johnson, Jeanne, Baumgart, Diane, Helmstetter, Edwin, & Curry, Chris, (1996) Augmenting Basic Communication in Natural Contexts, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co., Baltimore.
  30. King-DeBaun, Patti (2000) Books Made Easy, Park City Utah, Creative Communicating.
  31. Korsten, J., Dunn, D., Foss, T. & Francke, M., (1993) Every Move Counts: Sensory-Based Communication Techniques, San Antonio, Therapy Skill Builders.
  32. Levin, Jackie & Lynn Scherfenberg, (1987) Selection and Use of Simple Technology in Home, School, Work, and Community Settings, Ablenet, Minneapolis, MN,
  33. Levin, Jackie & Lynn Scherfenberg, (1987) Selection and Use of Simple Technology in Home, School, Work, and Community Settings, Minneapolis, MN, Ablenet.
  34. Light, Janice and Binger,Cathy (1998) Building Communicative Competence with Individuals Who Use Augmentative and Alternative Communication, Baltimore, Paul H. Brooks Publishing Co.
  35. Millar, D, Light, J, & Schlosser, R (2006). The impact of augmentative and alternative communication intervention on the speech production of individuals with developmental disabilities: A research review. Journal of Speech Language Hearing Research, 49, 248-264.
  36. Musselwhite, C. & King-Debaun, P. (1997) Emergent Literacy Success: Merging Technology and Whole Language for Students with Disabilities. Park City Utah: Creative Communicating
  37. Musslewhite, C (1993). RAPS: Reading Activities Project for Older Students. Phoenix, AZ: Southwest Human Development.
  38. Musslewhite, C. (1999) “Singing to Learn: Using Music to Jump-Start Language, Literacy, and Live! Part 1: Songs for Enrichment.” Closing the Gap, 18(2) 8-14.
  39. Musslewhite, C. (1999) “Singing to Learn: Using Music to Jump-Start Language, Literacy, and Live! Part 1: Songs for Learning.” Closing the Gap, 18(3) 1-37.
  40. Musslewhite, C. & King-Debaun, P. (1997). Emergent Literacy Success: Merging Technology and Whole Language for Students with Disabilities. Park City, Utah: Creative Communicating.
  41. Rackensperger, T, McNaughton, D, Krezman, C, & Williams, M (2005). When I first got it, I wanted to throw it over a cliff: The challenges and benefits of learning technology as described by individuals who use AAC. Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 21, 165-186.
  42. Reichle, Joe, Beukelman, David & Light, Janice (2002) Exemplary Practices for Beginning Communicators, Baltimore, Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  43. Romski, Mary Ann & Sevcik, Rose A. (1996). Breaking the Speech Barrier: Language Development Through Augmented Means. Baltimore. Paul H Brookes Publishing Co.
  44. Rowland, Charity. & Schweigert, Philip (1990) Tangible Symbols Systems: Symbolic Communication for Individuals with Multisensory Impairments. Tucson, AZ. Communication Skill Builders, Inc.
  45. Rowland, Charity. & Schweigert, Philip (2000) Tangible Symbols, Tangible Outcomes. Augmentative and Alternative Communication 16, 61-78.
  46. Rush, Elizabeth & Williams, Grace, (2000) Strategies for Using Functional Communication Successfully, Conference Proceedings, Ninth Biennial Conference of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication, 206-209.
  47. Rush, Elizabeth & Williams, Grace, (2002) AAC in the Curriculum: Adapt, Accommodate, Conference Proceedings, 23rd Southeast Augmentative Communication Conference, Sponsored by United Cerebral Palsy of Greater Birmingham, 169-176.
  48. Rush, Libby & Williams, Gracie (2001) Symbols Don’t Become Communication All By Themselves, Closing the Gap, Volume 20-2, 1-38.
  49. Sigafoos, Jeff (1999) “Creating Opportunities for Augmentative and Alternative Communication: Strategies for involving People with Developmental Disabilities.” Augmentative And Alternative Communication 15(3) 183-190.
  50. Snyder-McLean, L., Solomonson, B., McLean, J. & Sack, S. (1984) “Structuring Joint Action Routines: A Strategy for Facilitating Communication and Language development in the Classroom.” Topics in Speech and Language 5(3), 213-228.
  51. Stoller, Lynn C. (1998) Low-Tech Assistive Devices: A Handbook for the School Setting, Framingham, MA, Therapro, Inc.
  52. Sturm, J., Mirenda, P. & Beukelman, D. (2005). “Literacy Development of Children Who Use AAC.” In D. Beukelman & Pat Mirenda (Eds.) Augmentative and Alternative Communication for Children and Adults with Complex Communication Needs, Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.
  53. Tattershall, Sandra & Prendeville, Jo-Anne, (1995) Using Familiar Routines in Language Assessment and Intervention, Tucson, Communication Skill Builders.
  54. Williams, Grace & Rush, Elizabeth (2000) Strategies for Using Functional Communication Successfully, Conference Proceedings, 9th Biennial Conference International Society of Alternative and Augmentative Communication.
  55. Williams, Grace & Rush, Elizabeth, (2001) Symbols Don’t become Communication All By Themselves, Closing the Gap, Volume 20-2, 1-38.

Useful Websites

  1. www.Intellitools.com Gives info on special software and adapted keyboards for literacy and math.
  2. www.franklin.com Handheld portable device for students with learning disabilities reads 300,000 definitions and spells 80,000 words.
  3. www.dynavoxsys.com Portable augmentative communication devices using a recoded voice to speak for persons. By pressing pictures or words to select a category, the person then chooses phrases from a selected category.
  4. www.donjohnston.com WriteOutloud and Co:Writer are software programs that speak what a person types and helps them with typing and spelling errors. Co:Writer is also an outstanding word prediction program that allows persons to type a letter, then lists the most commonly used words that start with that letter. It also reads letters, words, sentences, and documents which help with visual impairments and learning disabilities. Buildibility is software that allows teachers to make the curriculum and stories accessible and allows students to create multi-media reports.
  5. www.enablingdevices.com Simple “light technology” devices with single messages, cause-effect devices, switch operated toys
  6. www.AttainmentCompany.com AAC, software, books, Hands On, Videos/DVDs for children and adults with special needs.
  7. www.interactiveaac.com Interactive AAC books on CD, by Kristine Drum CCC-SLP, These are wonderful books using Picture Communication Symbols on CD that you print with communication boards included. Familiar and original books on many topics are included.
  8. www.inspiration.com Kidspiration is a visual learning software that boosts reading and writing skills.
  9. www.funsoftware.com terrific software for language development, games for cause-effect
  10. www.assistivetech.com Stages is a combination of solutions that help parents and professionals identify learning needs, assess skills and select appropriate software
  11. www.atia.org – Welcome to the Assistive Technology Industry Association Web Site! Description: A not-for-profit membership organization of organizations manufacturing or selling technology-based…
  12. www.abledata.com Description: Searchable database of 19000 assistive technology products. Site maintained for the National Institute…
  13. www.resna.org Description: RESNA is an interdisciplinary association of people with a common interest in technology and disability.
  14. www.aac-rerc.org/aac-rerc The AAC-RERC conducts a comprehensive program of research, development, training, and dissemination activities that address the NIDRR priorities and seek to improve technologies for individuals who rely on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technologies. The mission of the AAC-RERC is to assist people who rely on augmentative and alternative communication to achieve their goals by advancing and promoting AAC technologies and supporting the individuals who use, manufacture, and recommend them.
  15. www.rehabtool.com Description: Offers leading-edge assistive and adaptive technology for children and adults with disabilities, computer
  16. at-training.com The Assistive Technology Training Online Project (ATTO) provides information on AT applications that help students with disabilities learn in elementary … Description: A project based at the Center for Assistive Technology at the University at Buffalo, offering free…
  17. www.pluk.org – Family Guide to Assistive Technology. Prepared By: Parents, Let’s Unite for Kids (PLUK) in cooperation with The Federation for Children … Description: Helps parents learn more about assistive technology and how it can help their children. Includes tips
  18. www.atsolutions.org Assistive Technology Solutions. Providing Plans for Do-It-Yourself Devices to Assist Persons with Disabilities. Books and Publications.
  19. www.dynavoxtech.com DynaVox Technologies, 2100 Wharton Street, Suite 400 Pittsburgh, PA 15203, PH. 412-222-7979
  20. www.prentrom.com Prentke Romich Company 1022 Heyl Road Wooster,Ohio 44691, PH. 800-262-198