Advocacy

Action Alert – Equal Pay for People with Disabilities

ACTION ALERT:
Comment Today to Support Equal Pay for People with Disabilities!

This week the Department of Labor announced its new website, “the Section 14(c) National Online Dialogue.” The purpose of the website is to collect comments from the public about the impact of paying subminimum wages to people with disabilities under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act. Employers with 14(c) certificates can legally pay people with disabilities less than the federal minimum wage, often times pennies on the dollar. Section 14(c) certificates are typically used in “sheltered workshops,” where people with disabilities are segregated from the broader community. The vast majority of disability advocates view Section 14(c) (created in 1938) as outdated, discriminatory, and reinforcing a life of poverty, segregation, and dependency on public support for people with disabilities. It is critical that you make your voice heard!

Input from people with disabilities, families, employment providers and employers is important. Share your perspective online here. COMMENT DEADLINE HAS BEEN EXTENDED TO FRIDAY JUNE 21,

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Policy & Advocacy Newsline ~ May 21, 2019

Transformation to Competitive Employment Act

Great news – the Transformation to Competitive Employment Act (H.R. 873/S.260) was featured at a hearing entitled “Eliminating Barriers to Employment: Opening Doors to Opportunity” in the House of Representatives on Tuesday, May 21 before the full Education & Labor Committee. This is a very positive step towards promoting awareness of this bill and generating support for it, but we need YOUR help to get more cosponsors onto this bill so that it can continue to advance! Please contact your Members of Congress through this NDSC Action Alert and let’s build support for this bill.

Introduced in the Senate by Senators Bob Casey (D-PA) and Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) and in the House by Chairman Bobby Scott (D-VA) and Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), this bipartisan legislation will address barriers to employment and expand opportunities for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities while phasing out subminimum wage certificates under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act over a six-year period. In addition, for those who choose not to work, work part-time, or for whom their disabilities make it too difficult to maintain work in a competitive integrated setting, this bill includes individualized wraparound services that provide them with opportunities for meaningful training and social activities in the community.

You can find a two-pager about this bill and additional resources on the Collaboration to Promote Self-Determination website. For information about Competitive Integrated Employment, please see this new website developed with our partners in the newly formed Coalition to Advance Competitive Integrated Employment. Please #WorkWithUs and build more opportunities for competitive integrated employment!

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My Advocacy Journey…and My Mission to Help You on Yours

Heather Sachs, NDSC Policy & Advocacy Director

Thirteen years ago, my husband and I were given the news that so many of you have also heard – your baby has Down syndrome. Ours was a delivery room diagnosis (and unfortunately not delivered in a sensitive way), and we were left in complete shock and confusion. We were expecting a healthy baby girl and didn’t even really know what Down syndrome was, and our lives were suddenly placed on a completely unanticipated and unclear path.

Heather and daugther with DS

With the support of national organizations like NDSC and our local Down syndrome group, we began to adjust to our new reality. We plunged into the world of heart surgery, early intervention, private therapies and we started learning about the potential personal and systemic challenges that our daughter could face.

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Policy & Advocacy Newsline ~ April 23, 2019

Transformation to Competitive Employment Act

NDSC continues to advocate for the passage of the Transformation to Competitive Employment Act (H.R. 873/S.260) and we need YOUR help! Introduced in the Senate by Senators Bob Casey (D-PA) and Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) and in the House by Chairman Bobby Scott (D-VA) and Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), this bipartisan legislation will address barriers to employment and expand opportunities for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities while phasing out subminimum wage certificates under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act over a six-year period. View a two-pager about this bill on the Collaboration to Promote Self-Determination website.

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Advocacy Training Boot Camp – Jawanda and Rachel Mast

My name is Jawanda Mast. Since my daughter Rachel was born with Down syndrome almost 20 years ago, I have been involved in advocating on behalf of individuals with Down syndrome and other disabilities and their families. I have had some remarkable opportunities to tell our story and have seen our story impact change. My daughter Rachel is 19 years old, and in her first semester of college. She is in the Bear POWER program at Missouri State University. She has been doing advocacy since she was a toddler. Recently, I shared with her that we would be a part of the National Down Syndrome Congress Advocacy Training Boot Camp this year. The discussion that followed was kind of funny and also on point.

Jawanda: Rachel, in June we are going to the National Down Syndrome Congress again.
Rachel: Yah. I am so excited to go back to the Youth and Adults conference. I will see my friends and dance. It is so much fun.
Jawanda: We are also attending the Advocacy Training Boot Camp. I am helping coordinate. Do you want to help?
Rachel: Yes! I will wear my pink cowboy boots?
Jawanda: Well, you can wear your pink cowboy boots but why?

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Policy & Advocacy Newsline ~ March 26, 2019

NDSC Senior Policy Advisor, Stephanie Smith Lee, Speaks in Trinidad and Tobago for World Down Syndrome Day Conference

NDSC Senior Policy Advisor, Stephanie Smith Lee, spoke in Trinidad and Tobago last week at the UN World Down Syndrome Day Conference. The conference is hosted in part by one of our NDAC Group members, Down Syndrome Family Network.

Stephanie spoke at the U.S. Embassy in Trinidad and Tobago on WDSD to Embassy staff, the media, and non-profit organizations about policy advocacy to create inclusive schools and the lessons learned in the US about how to create truly inclusive schools.  As a featured speaker, she shared her knowledge of the lessons learned in the U.S. about inclusive education and the key role of family and self-advocates in creating positive change. Listen to one of her speeches HERE.

Employment Policy Update

NDSC continues to prioritize employment policy issues for people with Down syndrome and other disabilities. Much of NDSC’s work on employment policy is with the Collaboration to Promote Self-Determination (more info HERE), a coalition of national groups whose mission is to push for major systemic reform of the nation’s disability laws and programs to advance economic security, enhance integrated community participation, and increase opportunities for people with disabilities so that they are able to lead self-determined lives.

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Policy & Advocacy Newsline ~ February 21, 2019

Transformation to Competitive Employment Act

NDSC is proud to be one of the organizations leading the effort to pass the Transformation to Competitive Employment Act (H.R. 873/S.260). Recently introduced in the Senate by Senators Bob Casey (D-PA) and Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) and in the House by Chairman Bobby Scott (D-VA) and Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-WA), this bipartisan legislation will address barriers to employment and expand opportunities for competitive integrated employment for people with disabilities while phasing out subminimum wage certificates under Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act over a six-year period.

While other bills have sought to phase out Section 14(c), this bill is unique in that it also includes a systematic approach to expand capacity for competitive integrated employment, particularly for people transitioning out of sheltered workshops. The grants provided under this bill would provide technical assistance and funding to help states and 14(c) certificate holders move to a paradigm of more integrated and innovative approaches to disability employment.

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Policy & Advocacy Newsline ~ January 21, 2019

New Congress, New Opportunities

The 116th Congress convened on January 3, 2019. The House of Representatives shifted from Republican to Democratic control, and there are over 100 new Members of Congress. We are optimistic that the change in control of the House, which has led to a divided government (as opposed to one party controlling the White House and both chambers of Congress), will present more proactive opportunities to implement NDSC’s policy agenda.

All bills that did not pass during the 115th Congress are finished. Some will be re-introduced and look similar, some will be changed significantly, while others may just be dropped entirely and not re-introduced. Cosponsors will need to be enlisted again, and new members and their staffs need to be educated on the issues salient to our community.

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Policy & Advocacy Newsline ~ December 20, 2018

Texas Court Rules Affordable Care Act Unconstitutional

The National Down Syndrome Congress (NDSC) is very concerned by the recent ruling issued by a federal judge in Texas in the case Texas v. United States, which struck down the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as unconstitutional. The Texas court ruled that the ACA’s individual mandate is unconstitutional, and because the mandate cannot be separated from the rest of the law, the rest of the ACA is also invalid. (Legal wonks can read the actual opinion HERE; or a summary HERE)

In striking down the ACA, the Texas judge reasoned that in 2012, the Supreme Court upheld the coverage mandate because of the Congress’s power to tax. In the tax reform package passed by Congress last year known as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, the tax penalty for failing to comply with the individual mandate to maintain coverage was removed. As a result of this removal, the Texas court reasoned that the mandate is no longer a “tax” so the legal underpinning for the ACA has been eliminated. Even more controversial in his ruling was his determination that the mandate is “essential” to the rest of the law, so without the mandate, the entire law becomes invalid. This includes the provisions protecting coverage for people with pre-existing conditions and the ability for young people to stay on a parent’s health plan until age 26.

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Policy & Advocacy Newsline ~ November 26, 2018

Midterm Election Results Lead to Divided Congress

As a result of the midterm elections, the House of Representatives will shift from Republican to Democratic control in the 116th Congress, which will begin in January 2019. The Senate will remain under Republican control with an increased Republican majority.  The party that has the majority of members in the House or Senate has substantial power to set the agenda, chair committees, and decide what bills will be considered for hearings and markups. The majority also has more members on each of the committees. The House has significant authority over appropriations and oversight of existing laws and regulations as well as oversight over the executive branch in general.

It is unknown exactly how this divided Congress will impact policy, but we believe that Congress will now be less likely to prevail in efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act or to cut or significantly alter Medicaid. Continued ideological differences and partisanship could possibly lead to ongoing gridlock, but we are hopeful instead that the new balance of power will lead to more bipartisan action. For an analysis of changes we can expect in House and Senate committee leadership and their impact on policy, see this document prepared by our colleagues at The Autism Society, HERE.

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